OpenStack Liberty and Debian

Long over due post

It’s been a long time I haven’t written here. And lots of things happened in the OpenStack planet. As a full time employee with the mission to package OpenStack in Debian, it feels like it is kind of my duty to tell everyone about what’s going on.

Liberty is out, uploaded to Debian

Since my last post, OpenStack Liberty, the 12th release of OpenStack, was released. In late August, Debian was the first platform which included Liberty, as I proudly outran both RDO and Canonical. So I was the first to make the announcement that Liberty passed most of the Tempest tests with the beta 3 release of Liberty (the Beta 3 is always kind of the first pre-release, as this is when feature freeze happens). Though I never made the announcement that Liberty final was uploaded to Debian, it was done just a single day after the official release.

Before the release, all of Liberty was living in Debian Experimental. Following the upload of the final packages in Experimental, I uploaded all of it to Sid. This represented 102 packages, so it took me about 3 days to do it all.

Tokyo summit

I had the pleasure to be in Tokyo for the Mitaka summit. I was very pleased with the cross-project sessions during the first day. Lots of these sessions were very interesting for me. In fact, I wish I could have attended them all, but of course, I can’t split myself in 3 to follow all of the 3 tracks.

Then there was the 2 sessions about Debian packaging on upstream OpenStack infra. The goal is to setup the OpenStack upstream infrastructure to allow packaging using Gerrit, and gating each git commit using the usual tools: building the package and checking there’s no FTBFS, running checks like lintian, piuparts and such. I knew already the overview of what was needed to make it happen. What I didn’t know was the implementation details, which I hoped we could figure out during the 1:30 slot. Unfortunately, this didn’t happen as I expected, and we discussed more general things than I wished. I was told that just reading the docs from the infra team was enough, but in reality, it was not. What currently needs to happen is building a Debian based image, using disk-image-builder, which would include the usual tools to build packages: git-buildpackage, sbuild, and so on. I’m still stuck at this stage, which would be trivial if I knew a bit more about how upstream infra works, since I already know how to setup all of that on a local machine.

I’ve been told by Monty Tailor that he would help. Though he’s always a very busy man, and to date, he still didn’t find enough time to give me a hand. Nobody replied to my request for help in the openstack-dev list either. Hopefully, with a bit of insistence, someone will help.

Keystone migration to Testing (aka: Debian Stretch) blocked by python-repoze.who

Absolutely all of OpenStack Liberty, as of today, has migrated to Stretch. All? No. Keystone is blocked by a chain of dependency. Keystone depends on python-pysaml2, itself blocked by python-repoze.who. The later, I upgraded it to version 2.2. Though python-repoze.what depends on version <= 1.9, which is blocking the migration. Since python-repoze.who-plugins, python-repoze.what and python-repoze.what-plugins aren’t used by any package anymore, I asked for them to be removed from Debian (see #805407). Until this request is processed by the FTP masters, Keystone, which is the most important piece of OpenStack (it does the authentication) will be blocked for migration to Stretch.

New OpenStack server packages available

On my presentation at Debconf 15, I quickly introduced new services which were released upstream. I have since packaged them all:

  • Barbican (Key management as a Service)
  • Congress (Policy as a Service)
  • Magnum (Container as a Service)
  • Manila (Filesystem share as a Service)
  • Mistral (Workflow as a Service)
  • Zaqar (Queuing as a Service)

Congress, unfortunately, was not accepted to Sid yet, because of some licensing issues, especially with the doc of python-pulp. I will correct this (remove the non-free files) and reattempt an upload.

I hope to make them all available in jessie-backports (see below). For the previous release of OpenStack (ie: Kilo), I skipped the uploads of services which I thought were not really critical (like Ironic, Designate and more). But from the feedback of users, they would really like to have them all available. So this time, I will upload them all to the official jessie-backports repository.

Keystone v3 support

For those who don’t know about it, Keystone API v3 means that, on top of the users and tenant, there’s a new entity called a “domain”. All of the Liberty is now coming with Keystone v3 support. This includes the automated Keystone catalog registration done using debconf for all *-api packages. As much as I could tell by running tempest on my CI, everything still works pretty well. In fact, Liberty is, to my experience, the first release of OpenStack to support Keystone API v3.

Uploading Liberty to jessie-backports

I have rebuilt all of Liberty for jessie-backports on my laptop using sbuild. This is more than 150 packages (166 packages currently). It took me about 3 days to rebuild them all, including unit tests run at build time. As soon as #805407 is closed by the FTP masters, all what’s remaining will be available in Stretch (mostly Keystone), and the upload will be possible. As there will be a lot of NEW packages (from the point of view of backports), I do expect that the approval will take some time. Also, I have to warn the original maintainers of the packages that I don’t maintain (for example, those maintained within the DPMT), that because of the big number of packages, I will not be able to process the usual communication to tell that I’m uploading to backports. However, here’s the list of package. If you see one that you maintain, and that you wish to upload the backport by yourself, please let me know. Here’s the list of packages, hopefully, exhaustive, that I will upload to jessie-backports, and that I don’t maintain myself:

alabaster contextlib2 kazoo python-cachetools python-cffi python-cliff python-crank python-ddt python-docker python-eventlet python-git python-gitdb python-hypothesis python-ldap3 python-mock python-mysqldb python-pathlib python-repoze.who python-setuptools python-smmap python-unicodecsv python-urllib3 requests routes ryu sphinx sqlalchemy turbogears2 unittest2 zzzeeksphinx.

More than ever, I wish I could just upload these to a PPA^W Bikeshed, to minimize the disruption for both the backports FTP masters, other maintainers, and our OpenStack users. Hopefully, Bikesheds will be available soon. I am sorry to give that much approval work to the backports FTP masters, however, using the latest stable system with the latest release, is what most OpenStack users really want to do. All other major distributions have specific repositories too (ie: RDO for CentOS / Red Hat, and cloud archive for Ubuntu), and stable-backports is currently the only place where I can upload support for the Stable release.

Debian listed as supported distribution on

Good news! If you go at you will see a list of supported distributions. I am proud to be able to tell that, after 6 months of lobbying from my side, Debian is also listed there. The process of having Debian there included talking with folks from the OpenStack foundation, and having Bdale to sign an agreement so that the Debian logo could be reproduced on Thanks to Bdale Garbee, Neil McGovern, Jonathan Brice, and Danny Carreno, without who this wouldn’t have happen.